Tag Archives: field work

Manuscript published on flux-gradient methods for ecosystem H2 flux measurements

A manuscript I’ve been working on entitled “Ecosystem fluxes of hydrogen: a comparison of flux-gradient methods,” was now been published in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (view paper online). Our goal was to present a detailed experimental approach for measuring ecosystem fluxes of H2 and to test different so-called “flux-gradient methods” for calculating the H2 fluxes. Some common trace gas flux methods, e.g. eddy covariance, are not available for species like H2 that cannot be measured precisely at high frequencies (<1 Hz). We hope this paper will help inform the design of future studies for which flux-gradient methods might be the best option for measuring trace gas fluxes.

Here are a couple videos on the instrument deployment and design for more information.

H2 fluxes were measured at Harvard Forest, MA

H2 fluxes were measured at Harvard Forest, MA

Thesis Defense!

I defended my thesis entitled “Field Measurement of the Fate of Atmospheric H2 in a Forest Environment: from Canopy to Soil” on October 4, 2012.

It was an incredible relief to finish the thesis document itself (link to .pdfCarl-Gustaf Rossby Prize for best PhD thesis in PAOC for the year). I really enjoyed preparing and giving my thesis defense presentation. It’s not often that one gets to present the culmination of six years of hard work and personal development to colleagues, family, and friends. I am grateful for mentorship from my advisor Ron Prinn, my thesis committee (Steve Wofsy – Harvard, Bill Munger – Harvard, Tanja Bosak – MIT, Colleen Hansel – WHOI, Shuhei Ono – MIT), and many others along the way!

I am continuing at MIT for a short (approximately 9 month) postdoctoral position with Ron Prinn to translate the work described in my thesis to publications. I am currently exploring possibilities for a postdoctoral position at the intersection of microbial ecology and atmospheric chemistry (trace gas cycles or aerosols) by searching advertised positions and writing fellowship proposals.

Feature in EAPS article: Atmospheric chemistry redux

Atmospheric Chemistry Redux

MIT Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science article describing the expansion of the atmospheric chemistry program at MIT over the past five years with a short feature on our work to understand the H2 soil sink in the field and in the lab.

PAOC spotlight video

PAOC Spotlight: Back to the forest Video

Micro-organisms have produced dramatic shifts in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere and continue to be important drivers of ocean- and land-atmosphere exchanges of gases that have a strong influence on atmospheric composition and climate. An interesting example is the microbial influence on atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2), which dominates the fate of this gas in the atmosphere. H2 is emitted to the atmosphere by about half natural and half anthropogenic, or human-induced, processes but it is predominantly removed from the atmosphere by microorganisms in the soil, which makes this process the most important, yet least understood, player in the atmospheric H2 budget.

In this video graduate student Laura Meredith shares her thesis work to build and deploy an instrument to the Harvard Forest Long Term Ecological Research site in central Massachusetts. Laura is in the Climate Physics and Chemistry Program. Her advisor is Ron Prinn.

Helping deploy Anita’s instrument to Darjeeling, India

Update: The first publication from Dr. Anita Ganesan’s work in Darjeeling has been published in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (view document online).

I’m in my second week in India, where I am helping fellow Prinn-group graduate student Anita Ganesan deploy her gas chromatograph to Darjeeling, a town high on a ridge in West Bengal in the foothills of the Himalayas (Anita has a blog now!). It’s quite a trek to get to the Bose Institute where her instrument will be housed. We spent a few days adjusting to the change in time and culture in the hectic city of Kolkata. A haze hung over the city, making the day seem darker and the nights lighter, and there was a constant smell of burning. It was not unpleasant, but the concerns about the impact of particulate levels on air quality and health that we are taught in the classroom were made real. Two million people in this city and its surroundings breathe this local atmosphere daily, until it is exported to the globe. Continue reading

Porcupine takes over Harvard Forest EMS shed

The porcupine was first spotted in the fall during a lunch break at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site instrument shed. It continued to reside beneath the shed as was clearly evident by the snow tracks (or more like a trough) leading to a nearby chewed on balsam fir. I set up a crittercam to record the action, and have compiled a “best of” video of our porcupine waltzing through the snow…

Laura goes to Harvard Forest – instrument deployment

Deployment day!

Two years after embarking on my thesis project to design and build a custom instrument that measures hydrogen fluxes, I deploy my creation to the Harvard Forest Long Term Ecological Research site in Petersham, Massachusetts. The instrument shed is tight, but with the help of colleagues at Harvard University, the move is successful. In this short documentary by co-student Ryan Abernathey we introduce the forest and the project, but the work has only just begun…

Laura at Harvard Forest from Ryan Abernathey on Vimeo.